NBCI is ushering in a new era of broadened engagement of African-American and Latino communities in clinical trials. Particularly given the unethical and illegal behaviors involved with the Tuskegee Experiment and the intentional absence or lack of critical information for the involved subjects by governmental officials, the NBCI comprehensive approach utilizes important lessons learned from this historic medical abuse and ALL others experienced within African-American and Latino communities for generating robust communication, demonstration, and education strategies toward substantially improving clinical trial participation.

Introduction

The National Black Church Initiative (NBCI), a coalition of 150,000 African-American and Latino Churches with 27.7 million members, seeks to eradicate racial disparities in healthcare, technology, education, housing, and the environment. The mission of the NBCI is to provide critical wellness information to its members and the broader public using faith-based, out-of-the-box, cutting-edge solutions to address economic and social issues. Our solutions are backed by statistical analysis, science-based strategies and techniques, and methods that have been proven to be effective and efficient.

To that end, NBCI is launching an innovative, science-based clinical strategic plan to promote clinical trials among traditionally underrepresented groups of African-Americans and Latinos. The NBCI National Clinical Trials Strategic Plan (NCTSP) is a comprehensive program poised to enhance understanding, education, and participation of African-Americans and Latinos and usher in a new era concerning the disproportionate representation of African-Americans and Latinos in clinical trials.

Particularly given the documented medical abuses of African-Americans involved in the historic Tuskegee Experiment and Henrietta Lacks and others, the NCTSP engages access to 27.7 million African-Americans and Latinos with integrity, confidentiality, and health standards-based protocols. Increasing the involvement of African-Americans and Latinos within clinical trials serves as a conduit for improving the long-term effectiveness of medical prescriptions and treatments to combat leading chronic diseases (i.e. COVID, cancer, heart disease, stroke, diabetes).

Black Americans’ Views of and Engagement With Science

Black Americans have largely positive views of medical researchers’ competence; the majority are concerned about the potential for misconduct

By Cary Funk

Black and Hispanic Perspective Main

Science offers the promise to aid society in tackling its most pressing problems, lifting living standards, health and life expectancies. Learning about science can enrich people’s lives in and outside of the classroom, and advances in scientific developments can spark amazement while transforming the ways we live and work.

A new Pew Research Center survey takes a wide-ranging look at Black Americans’ views and experiences with science, spanning medical and healthcare settings, educational settings, and as consumers of science-related news and information in daily life.

The COVID-19 pandemic is a prominent reminder of the disparate health impacts Black Americans face, and of long-standing concerns about levels of trust or mistrust between scientists and Black communities.

Against this backdrop, there are ongoing concerns that the segments of the public most engaged with science – people who attend science-related events, participate in medical research studies, and fill science, technology, engineering, and math classrooms and the professional ranks of these fields – do not adequately reflect the racial and ethnic diversity of the nation.

The new survey, along with a series of focus groups, highlights the multifaceted views Black Americans hold when it comes to trust in medical research scientists. The findings speak to how contemporary experiences with the healthcare system, as well as past injustices, inform the range of attitudes Black adults express. In this and other topics addressed in the survey, there are important differences in how Black Americans see these issues depending on their education, age, gender and other characteristics.

The importance of representation for Black Americans is a through-line seen across the topics covered in the survey. A majority of Black Americans say more examples of Black high achievers in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) would encourage more young Black people to pursue training in these fields. Issues around representation are at the center of doubts some focus group participants expressed about the openness of science-related professions to Black people.

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NBCI National Clinical Trials Strategic Plan (NCTSP)

BLACK CHURCH CLINICAL CZAR POSITION DESCRIPTION.pdf

The Office of the Black Church Clinical Czar for the National Black Church Initiative offers an important platform for empowering African-American and Latino medical scientific clinicians to speak on matters of science and health affecting the Black Church and our 109 million constituents.
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NATIONAL CLINICAL TRIALS STRATEGIC PLAN (NCTSP).pdf

Many illnesses such as sickle cell anemia, asthma, diabetes, heart disease, HIV/AIDS, and certain kinds of cancer, such as prostate cancer, affect African-Americans more than other people. Yet, little is known about how they respond to treatment, so African-American volunteers are needed to help scientists learn how different treatments affect them. When African-Americans take part in clinical trials, they help improve the health of all people and provide greater understanding of health disparities.
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The National Black Church Initiative (NBCI) National Clinical Strategic Plan.pdf

NBCI is ushering in a new era of broadened engagement of Black and Latino communities in clinical trials. Particularly given the unethical and illegal behaviors involved with the Tuskegee Experiment and the intentional absence or lack of critical information for the involved subjects by governmental officials, the NBCI comprehensive approach utilizes important lessons learned from this historic medical abuse and ALL others experienced within Black and Latino communities for generating robust communication, demonstration, and education strategies toward substantially improving clinical trial participation.
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National Black Church Initiative National Clinical Trial Strategic Plan (NCTSP).pdf

The National Black Church Initiative (NBCI) is ushering in a new era of broadened engagement of Black and Latino communities in clinical trials. Particularly given the unethical and illegal behaviors involved with the Tuskegee Experiment and the intentional absence or lack of critical information for the involved subjects by governmental officials, the NBCI comprehensive approach utilizes important lessons learned from this historic medical abuse and ALL others experienced within Black and Latino communities for generating robust communication, demonstration, and education strategies toward substantially improving clinical trial participation.
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Clinical Trials Poster